Antioxidants. The Army To Help Hepatocytes

The majority of the liver is made up of hepatocytes, and these cells have unique ability to multiply rapidly to regenerate parts of the liver after damage. But hepatocytes are extremely vulnerable to oxidative stress.

Our liver is a dark, reddish-brown organ, about the size of a small football that sits in the upper right hand corner of our abdomen. It is our largest internal organ, and has a multitude of functions including producing bile for digestion, storing glycogen for energy, and detoxifying chemicals. The majority of the liver is made up of hepatocytes, and these cells have unique ability to multiply rapidly to regenerate parts of the liver after damage. But hepatocytes are extremely vulnerable to oxidative stress.

Every day, hepatocytes face a constant barrage of attacks by free radicals. These unstable, and highly reactive molecules stem from ultraviolet radiation, environmental pollutants and toxins, viruses, alcohol and drugs. In addition, excessive weight and poor blood sugar control are internal factors that can also boost free radical numbers. Anytime these scavengers outnumber our natural antioxidant supply, we enter a state of oxidative stress.

So it stands to reason that antioxidant supplementation presents a rational way to relieve oxidative stress in the liver. Li and colleagues, in their article The Role Of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases, discuss several trending antioxidant supplements and other natural products with evidence for use in liver disease, such as vitamin E, coenzyme Q10, silymarin, N-acetylcysteine, and mitoquinone mesylate.

To read The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases, click here.

Topics: All Blog Articles, Liver Health, Mitochondrial Health

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